Saturday, June 16, 2012

Three Good Things: It's All About the Visual




What could be cooler than having your story published on a building? VOLT author Alan Heathcock's story "Streetlamps" now graces the exterior wall of the Oliver Russell building in downtown Boise, Idaho. From the Boise Weekly:
"Streetlamps" tells his fictional account of Heathcock's full-blooded Cherokee grandmother first meeting with his grandfather. Their real-life encounter ended with a wedding, which provoked much controversy in their small mid-western town.

If you, like me, can't get to Boise to see "Streetlamps" in person, you can listen to the author read it over at This Land Press.






In this era of e-books and digital printing, when words travel seemingly instantly and invisibly from author to publisher to e-reader, how striking to see this gorgeous letterpress plate for featherproof booksforthcoming The Minus Times Collected: Twenty Years / Thirty Issues (1992–2012) , edited by Hunter Kennedy. Snooping around the publisher's website, it is even more fascinating to learn about the literary magazine's history and contributors:
For twenty years, The Minus Times has been the most elusive literary magazine in America—and definitely the only one to be composed on a Royal standard typewriter. Begun as an open letter to strangers and fellow misfits, it grew to become the breeding ground for the next generation of American fiction. Contributors include Sam Lipsyte, David Berman, Patrick DeWitt, & Wells Tower, with illustrations by David Eggers and Brad Neely as well as interviews with Dan Clowes, Barry Hannah, and a yet-to-be-famous Stephen Colbert... All thirty of the-nearly-impossible-to-find issues of this improvised literary almanac are now assembled for the first time, typos and all. Drag City is teaming up with featherproof to publish this over-sized coffee-table-crackin' collection. 

Last but not least, I've mentioned them before (but if you missed it, or aren't yet following - get on that, please), The Safety Pin Review publishes tiny lovely stories designed to be worn out in the world by volunteer story-wearers. Each story's journey becomes a unique and a remarkable experience shared by wearers and readers alike. Check out this week's haunting story by David Sklar:




What are your good things this week? Share in the comments below, and happy reading!




10 comments :

  1. how cool!

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    1. thanks yes, fun stuff! people are so creative :D

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  2. I love the pinned stories! Very creative. they should make permanent t-shirts out of them for sale. they'd do well!

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  3. This is fantastic! I love all the cool links you include, but I must say that Heathcock's story on a building is my favorite. How magnificent is that?!

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    1. It really is magnificent! Must be an amazing experience for the author.

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    2. Thanks much, and yes, it's pretty crazy. Yesterday I was driving downtown and saw a group of people standing there reading the building. Gave me a pretty huge smile. Thanks for the shout out. Hope all is well!

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    3. That is just so awesome! (I might be tempted to sneak in amongst them and eavesdrop ;D) So very welcome, and thank you for sharing the link!

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  4. Oh, yes! More beautiful stories on buildings, please! I love the notion/movement that proclaims that you should be able to read everywhere, on everything, not just between pages.

    These Three Good Things features of yours are always gems, dear Jennifer. Thank you for sharing them with us!

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    1. Thanks, Shivanee! I agree with your "read everywhere, on everything" sentiment entirely. I was curious myself how many other stories on buildings there are out there... perhaps a little research is in order!

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Thanks for visiting - thoughts welcome.